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"'REBURY COLLECT 

librm n LEge 

* U 


VOL. LV II MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT, THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 1962 NO. 13 


Players ’ Next Production Fourteen Events 

To Be 4 Italian Straw Hat’ Scheduled for 

! Winter Carnival 


Panhellenie Sets 
Rushing Schedule 


french Musical Comedy Is Set 
for Presentation On March 8-10 


By ItONNY waggoner 

‘■Italian Straw Hat," a French 
musical comedy by Eugene La- 
biche and Mare-Michel, is to be 
the Players’ next presentation. 
Directed by Erie Volkert, pro¬ 
fessor of drama, the produc¬ 
tion will be given Thursday, Fri¬ 
day and Saturday evenings, 
March 8, 9, 10, in Wright 

Memorial Theatre. 

The play, a period piece of 
the 19th century, is quite differ¬ 
ent in atmosphere from modern 
drama. The set designed b y 
Todd Glenn ’62, costumes, de¬ 
signed by Carol Brewer ’62, and 
makeup, supervised by Charles 
Canterbury ’63, as well as the 
action and dialogue, capture the 
flavor of the times in a light, 
entertaining manner. Occasional 
musical interludes provided by 
the chorus and various solos by 
the cast further convey the 
play’s “delightful atmosphere.” 

Set in Paris 

Paris is the scene of action 
for the 37 members of the 
cast. Duncan Kendall ’64 plays 
Fadinard, a landowner; Brian 
Pendleton ’63, Nonancourt, a 
horticulturist; Edward Etsen 
’63, Beauperthuis; Kipp Davis 
'62, Tardiveau, a bookkeeper; 
Arnold Gelber ’65, Bobin, neph¬ 
ew of Nonancourt; Peter Schos- 
berg '63, Emile Tavernier, a 
lieutenant; Joseph Aulisi ’64, 
Felix, servant of Fadinard; 
Corn tlandt vanRooten ’65, Achil- 
lode Rosalba, a young dandy; 
Catherine Scimeca ’65, Anais, 
wife of Beauperthuis; Marjorie 
Gassner ’62, Baroness de Cham- 
pigny; Andrea Georgi ’65, Cla¬ 
ra, a milliner; Elizabeth Hol¬ 
mes '65, Virginie, chambermaid 
of the Baroness; Stephen Dela¬ 
no '62, a corporal; and Carolyn 
Buttolph ’65, a servant, Kenneth 
Rosen ’64 and William Potter '63 
are the guards. The role of He¬ 
lene is yet to be cast. 

Two Choruses 

There are two choruses — 


one consisting of the members 
of the wedding, and the other 
made up of the wedding guests. 
The members of the wedding 
are: David Rubenstein ’62, Fred¬ 
erick Davis ’63, John Sirfipson 
’63, Donna Carlstrom ’64, Susan 
Edwards '64, and Roger Blake, 
Milton Walker, Carolyn Curtiss, 
Jane Isaacs, and Maris Swan, 
all class of ’65. 

Richard Dauer ’63, Gigi 
Brown ’63, Daniel Reynolds 
'64, Carol Clegg '64, and James 
Dorrance, Peter Kingsley, Jud¬ 
ith Couperus, and Pamela Ken¬ 
yon, all class of '65, are the 
wedding guests. 

Tickets for the production 
will be on sale at the ticket of¬ 
fice for $1.00. 

Two Juniors 
Are Named To 
Conference Post 

Peter Kullberg and Ann 
Wadsworth, both '63, have re¬ 
cently been chosen co-chairmen 
of the 1962 Religion Conference. 
They will select a committee 
in the near future, and will an¬ 
nounce the conference topic in 
the spring. * 

Kullberg is house manager of 
Alpha Tau Omega and a mem¬ 
ber of the varsity football and 
track teams. 

Miss Wadsworth, a junior 
counselor and president of Bat- 
tell Center, also holds the posi¬ 
tions of Pi Beta Phi rush cap¬ 
tain and co-chairman of the 
Junior Weekend Queen Com¬ 
mittee. In her sophomore year, 
she served as a guide. 

The announcement w a s 
made by Ralph Ellis and Bar¬ 
bara Buchanan, both '62, co- 
chairman of the 1961 Confer¬ 
ence. 



CAMPUS — dePrdtsch 

The poster which will be used to publicize Winter Car¬ 
nival activities both at Middlebury and in neighboring areas 
161 l,, e work of Frederick Ilrink ’63. 

Brink employed the design of a black skier against the 
backdrop of white mountains and a red background to win 
l| ie annual Carnival poster contest. 

Kunners-up in the contest, to which a great many entries 
"ere submitted, were Frederick Galacar ’64 and Roger Blake 
U5. 

Robert Reilf, assistant professor of fine arts, was the con- 
'•“st advisor. Galacar won the Combo ticket contest. 


For students despairing over 
the imminence of exams, a ray 
of hope has appeared on the 
horizon. Winter Carnival is ap¬ 
proaching. 

From Feb. 22 to 25, students 
may amuse themselves at one 
or all of the fourteen events 
scheduled. 

A leading dance band has 
been secured for the Carnival 
Ball and a top jazz artist for 
the Klondike Rush. Both of 
these attractions will be an¬ 
nounced in the next issue of 
The CAMPUS. 

Women will have special' two 
o’clock late permissions o n 
Friday and Saturday nights. 

On Thursday afternoon there 
will be a basketball game with 
Clarkson and the Ice Show, 
“Day in New York," will be 
featured in the evening. 

On Friday morning the Men’s 
Downhill and the Women's Sla¬ 
lom will take place. In the aft¬ 
ernoon Middlebury will face 
Amherst in hockey and the 
Cross-Country Race will b e 
held at Breadloaf. Later that 
night the Carnival Ball and the 
Coronation of the king and 
queen of Carnival will be the 
featured attractions. 

The skiing events on Satur¬ 
day will be the Men’s Slalom 
and the Women’s Downhill in 
the morning and the Jumping 
Competition in the afternoon. La¬ 
ter in the afternoon the skiers 
will be rewarded for their 'ef¬ 
forts by being honored at the 
Skier’s banquet. The weekend 
will be climaxed by the Ice 
Show and the Klondike Rush on 
Saturday night. 


Art Display 
From Japan 
Is Exhibited 

Japanese prints are featured 
in an exhibition in Carr Hall 
during the month of January. 
There are 37 prints and one 
painting in the exhibit. 

The rarest print in the show 
is an Actor Print by Sharaku 
lent to Middlebury College by 
the Oleson Foundation. Sharaku 
is probably one of the most 
mysterious figures in Japanese 
art history. He was an actor 
by profession, but for a brief 
period of nine months he crea¬ 
ted all his prints and then aban¬ 
doned the art scene for the rest 
l of his life. Sharaku’s print has 
a shiny metallic background 
which was made by sprinkling 
ground mica on the ink while 
still in the process of drying. 

The earliest print in the pres¬ 
entation dates about mid-18th 
century. It portrays a husky boy 
balancing himself on a couple 
of barrels. The color of the 
print is limited to pale green 
and pink. It is thought that the 
(Continued on Page 3) 


Inside Story 

Illick concludes his case for 
unilateral disarmament. 

Page 2 


Romulo Fails To 
Attain Objective 


By PAGE ROCHESTER 

If one evaluates a speaker 
solely on the basis of fulfillment 
of stated objectives, General 
Carlos Romulo failed miserably 
in his address last Thursday. It 
was a great disappointment to 
many intensely interested peo¬ 
ple that he did not "bring into 
closer view the international 
perspective" and furthermore, 
that his statements exhibited 
high emotion, rather than the 
clear logic he proposed to use. 

A frequent criticism of Mid¬ 
dlebury students*is that they 
do not keep up with current 
events. However, there could 
not have been a soul in the Cha¬ 
pel who did not realize that the 
Marshall Plan was of great aid 
to post-World War II Europe, 
and that in her policy at the 
time, the United States was not 
aggressive, although she had 
every opportunity to be. 

General Romulo touched upon 
the problem of the admission 
of Red China to the UN. His ex¬ 
perience in the UN as President 
of the General Assembly and 
original signer of the UN char¬ 
ter provoked considerable hope 
that he would throw new light 
upon the situation. Romulo 



pointed out that, while Red 
China did not meet the estab¬ 
lished requirements for mem¬ 
bership in the UN, her 600 mil¬ 
lion inhabitants cannot be ignor¬ 
ed. This is hardly an original 
observation, but his wit in com¬ 
paring Communist China to A1 
Capone, who likewise did not 
have to be "admitted" to the 
Chicago police force to promote 
peace and order, was one of his 
strongest points. Interspersed 
throughout the speech were oth¬ 
er humorous additions which 
were relevant and genuinely 
funny. 

(Continued on Page 5) 


- i 

1962 Sorority 
Rushing to Begin 
February Fifth 

Sorority women, freshmen, 
and transfer students will en¬ 
gage in a two-week rushing pro* 
gram beginning Feb. 5. 

The rushing schedule, releas¬ 
ed by Sarah Howland ’62, Pan- 
hellenic Council President, is as 
follows. 

Monday, Feb. 5, the Panhel- 
lenic reception from 4 to 5 p.m., 
and open houses from 5:15 to 
6 p. m. and 7 to 9:15 p. m. 

Tuesday, Feb. 6, open houses 
from 4:15 to 5:45 p. m, and rule 
reading in the freshman dorms 
by Panhellenic Council mem¬ 
bers. 

Thursday, Feb. 8, invitations 
to first parties will be distrib¬ 
uted at lunch time. 

Sunday, Feb. 11, first parties 
will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. 

Monday, Feb. 12, first parties 
will be held from 7 to 9 p. m. 
and there will be corridor meet¬ 
ings for all freshmen who have 
questions at 10 p. m. 

Tuesday, Feb. 13, informals 
will take place from 4 to 6 par), 
and 6:45 to 8:15 p. m. Fresh¬ 
men will sign for second par¬ 
ties from 8:30 to 9 p, m. 

Thursday, Feb. 15,' invitations 
to second parties will be distrib¬ 
uted during lunch, and there 
will be second parties from 7 
to 9:50 p. m. 

Friday, Feb. 16, second par¬ 
ties will again be held from 7 
to 9:50 p. m. 

Saturday, Feb, 17, informals 
will take place from 4 to 6 p. m. 
and the freshmen will sign for 
bids from 7 to 7:30 p. m. 

Sunday, Feb. 18, bids will be 
distributed, and the sororities 
will have pledging. 

Stratton Will 
Visit in West 

President Samuel Stratton left 
Thursday, Jan. 11, on a trip 
through the western states to 
bring news of Middlebury Col- 
lege to 990 alumni residing in 
the area. 

Gordon Perine, director of 
placement, alumni relations 
and the alumni fund will join 
him on Jan. 22. 

At a series of six dinners in 
Los Angeles, San Francisco, 
Portland, Denver, Chicago and 
Cleveland, they will show a 
thirty-five minute film, "Di¬ 
mensions of a College," depict¬ 
ing life at Middlebury College 
today. 

During the trip, Perine will 
visit schools and companies in 
order to widen the scope of 
placement possibilities for sen¬ 
iors seeking admission to grad¬ 
uate schools or employment .aft¬ 
er graduation. He will also so¬ 
licit contributions for the alum¬ 
ni fund. 








PAGE 2 


Student Health 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


Difficult Alternative 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, i 962 


Last week’s episode of food poisoning in For¬ 
est dining halls should serve as a reminder that 
the College still has not solved all its food prepa¬ 
ration problems. 

The completion of Proctor Hall with its mod¬ 
ern kitchen facilities three semesters ago elimi¬ 
nated the men’s dining halls in Gifford and Hep¬ 
burn, places where food poisoning generally oc¬ 
curred once or twice a year. No widespread sick¬ 
ness attributable to Proctor meals has yet been 
reported, and with the combination of good 
equipment and a careful kitchen staff no cases 
are to be expected. 

But Proctor Hall has not solved the kitchen 
problem in Forest. In fact, in a certain sense it 
has made the situation on the women’s campus 
worse by taking attention away from it. Student 
pressure for a positive program to assure that 
all food is pure has lessened greatly since Proc¬ 
tor was opened. 

The College has a responsibility for the meals 
it serves. If it requires all women students to eat 
in college dining halls, it must also guarantee 
them that the food is not contaminated. Admit¬ 
tedly, food poisoning does not happen frequently, 
but with care it should never occur. 

Middlebury has begun a program of kitchen 
inspections at fraternities this year and by open 
admission desires to have all men eventually eat 
in college dining halls. We favor the former of 
these programs; the latter we find questionable. 
But the infrequency of food problems in frater¬ 
nities is notable in the face of last week's trou¬ 
bles in Forest. The College might well clean its 
own house if it is to criticize others. 


And Welfare 

Ice on sidewalks is often a problem at Middle¬ 
bury in the winter and this year certainly has 
been no exception. 

In all fairness to Buildings and Grounds, it 
has tried sand, but this merely collects in the 
many dips in the rough ice, leaving the higher 
spots just as slippery. 

The cost of removing the ice might seem 
great at first glance, but it would prove small 
compared to the expense of one or two liability 
suits. 


THE CAMPUS 

The student newspaper of Middlebury College, published every 
Thursday in the College year, except official College holidays. 

Second-class postage paid at Middlebury, Vermont. Subscription 
rate: $4.00 per year. 

Editorial and business offices in Proctor Hall, Middlebury College, 
Middlebury, Vermont. Telephones: DUdley 8-2813 and 8-2192. 

Business hours Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. Represented for 
national advertising by the National Advertising Service, Inc. 

All contributions to this newspaper are subject to Its editorial 
policy, and style rules. The editorial board reserves the right to 
edit and condense letters received for publication. 


Opinions expressed on the editorial page do not necessarily re¬ 
flect the official position of the College. Signed columns, letters 
and articles are the responsibility of the writer. 


RICHARD BLODGETT ’62 . Editor-In-Chlef 

MICHAEL KULICK ’62 . Business Manager 

Frederic W. Swift . Faculty Advisor 


FRANCIS SHEPARD ’63 
Executive Editor 
PAUL BOYD ’62 
Associate Editor 
DIANE ALPERN '62 
Managing Editor 
SABIN STREETER ’63 
Sports Editor 



BARBARA BUCHANAN ’62 
Circulation Manager 

MARY ANN WOODBURY ’62 
Local Advt. Manager 

JERI HARRIS ’62 
National Advt. Manager 


William White '62, News Editor; Betty Ann Cooper '63, Feature 
Editor; Roger Manternach '64, Photography Editor; Michele Whitney 
'63, Exchange Editor; Susan Washburn '63, Outside Editor; Deborah 
Crehan '64, Morgue Operator; Howard Tolley '65, Assistant Sports 
Editor. 


BUSINESS ASSOCIATES 

Ellen Stein '62, Comptroller; Catherine Telfair '64, Assistant Cir¬ 
culation Manager; Charles Johnson '63, Office Manager; Elizabeth 
Edmonds ’64, Assistant Office Manager; Breneman Blaine '63, Local 
Billing and Collection; Nancy Porter ’64, Circulation Billing. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Barbara Miller '62, John Simpson ’63, Linda Patton '63, Jeffrey 
Joseph '64, Molly Buffum '64, Carol Clegg '64, Dorothea Ells '64. 
Ann Kllng '64, Patricia Livingston '64, Page Rochester '64, Karin 
Rydlng '64, Veronica Waggoner ’64, Jeffrey Alderman '65, Daniel 
Bouchara '65, Hugo deFritsch ’65, Vivian Goldberg '65, Jane 
Henne '65, Jean MacCormack '65, Eve Palenske '65, Diane Takamunc 
'65, Gail Tldcman '65. 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Charles Burdick '63, Charles Selliheimer '63, Stephen Wilke,rson 
’63, Linda Berry '63, Katherine Cllley '63, Anthony Hershfleld '64, 
Smith Mowry '64, Wlebke Lange '64. Jane Myers '64, Raynelle Stuart 
64. Merrily Robinson '64, Caroline Bowersock '65, Frances Bower- 
sock '65. 


Illick Sees Hope For Peace 
In Non-Violent Resistance 


By J. ROWLAND ILLICK 
Assoc. Prof, of Geography 

Eisenhower asserted, “There 
is no alternative peace.” If 
military might will not provide 
this peace, is there another 
way? I suggest that there is, 
The alternative is an old one, 
it is a practical one, and it is a 
difficult one. 

It is non-violent resistance to 
evil. Unilateral disarmament is 
the key to such a program. 
Non-violent resistance to evil 
implies working hard against 
tyranny of all kinds including 
war. It is not the same as non- 
reststance to evil, which implies 
a “do-nothing” and submissive 
attitude. Jesus did not meet Ro¬ 
man power submissively. His 
doctrine was a positive one. He 
advocated turning the other 
cheek, not once, but many 
times, going the second mile, 
and giving not only the garment 
demanded, but another as well. 
His was a doctrine of love or 
service, of returning good for 
evil. 

Proved Validity 

Ghandi, Martin Luther King, 
Jr., Kagawa, Chief Luthuli and 
many others have proved the 
validity of this philosophy. If 
Jesus had not died demonstrat¬ 
ing this principle, I doubt that 
Christianity would have won 
many adherents. The world 
struggle today is not a power 
battle, but a contest between 
philosophies of life. As Martin 
Luther King, Jr. says, “History 
is ultimately guided by spirit, 
not matter.” Human values can¬ 
not be set aside to achieve a 
desired goal. Violence, discrim¬ 
ination, lying, cheating, dishon¬ 
esty, spying, deception, and 
guilt by association are techni¬ 
ques too often employed be¬ 
tween peoples. 

Non-violent resistance re¬ 
jects such techniques and ad¬ 
vocates unilateral disarmament 
along with a broad program to 
assist others to help themselves. 
To allow for necessary econo¬ 
mic, political, and social ad¬ 
justments, disarmament would 
proceed through a prescribed 
time period. 

The program would call for 
the cessation of manufacture 
and testing of all nuclear wea¬ 
pons and their eventual destruc¬ 
tion, abandonment of prepara¬ 
tions for chemical and germ 
warfare, rapid ' curtailment of 
military aid to other countries, 

To The Editor 

Pornography 

To the Editor: 

As a devout Middlebury alum¬ 
nus I return to the campus 
each year to note progress and 
to reminisce about my college 
days. During my last visit, over 
Christmas vacation, I was 
browsing through the new books 
acquired by the library and 
was shocked to find a copy of 
a book so scandalous and sin¬ 
ful that my immediate reaction 
was to burn it, Henry Miller’s 
“Tropic of Cancer” is porno¬ 
graphy at its worst. 

In my days, such an un¬ 
wholesome work would never 
have been allowed at the col¬ 
lege. To deform the new and 
beautiful library building with 
(Continued on Page 7) 


This article, second in a 
series of two by Prof, Illick, 
concludes his view of the 
disarmameat prohlem . 


and a simultaneous expansion 
of technical assistance programs 
based on need rather than on 


expediency. It would advocate 
more intensive efforts f) o 
“clean house” at home, and 
willingness to base foreign and 
domestic policy on moral rather 
than selfish principles, a 
strengthening of the United 
Nations and the International 
Court of Justice, and greater 
effort to work through the Uni¬ 
ted Nations rather than unilat¬ 
erally, and dedication to the 
concept that membership in the 
United Nations should be uni- 


ernments. Indeed, I think that 
people want peace so much that 
one of these days governments 
better get out of their way and 
let them have it.” 

Ghandi demonstrated the ef. 
fectiveness of positive non-vio. 
lent action with his concept of 
“Satyagraha” or truth (lov e ) 
force. In other words, the elim. 
ination of the negative and the 
accentuation of the positive. 

Citizen Awareness 

I have already said that such 
a step will be a difficult one 
for it implies that Americans 
will need to work as assiduous¬ 
ly for this program as tho<y do 
now for the arms program. Our 
citizens will need to augment 
their acquaintance with the 
world, its people, states, and 
livelihoods. 


versal. 

If such a platform for na¬ 
tional action were announced 
publicly in the United Nations 
and then implemented, it would 
quickly win the support of the 
world. For a world power and 
leader, and the earth’s richest 
country to ennunciate and fol¬ 
low such a program, even uni¬ 
laterally, would stir the hope 
and the heart of the world's 
citizens as nothing has touched 
them before. Faced with the al¬ 
ternative of nuclear destruction 
what could be lost in following 
such a procedure? There is the 
world to win. 

World Is Waiting 

In unilaterally disarming, the 
United States would be taking 
the first and most difficult step 
and the one the world has been 
waiting for. By thus voluntarily 
removing a major cause of fear 
in the world, universal opinion 
would support the move s o 
completely that nuclear arms 
for defense would be unneces¬ 
sary. As Eisenhower said to 
Prime Minister Macmillan on 


In a recent Associated Press 
survey regarding world affairs 
understanding by United States 
citizens, a telephone interview¬ 
er asked an apartment house 
resident, "What can you tell 
me about Laos?” After a mom- 
erit of silence, the response 
came. “There’s no one by that 
name on our floor, you must be 
asking about the new family 
downstairs. Why not call the 
landlady about them?” Max 
Plowman was correct when he 
commented, “war will grow 
more and more recurrent as 
long as people decline to re¬ 
gard it as a personal matter." 
We will have to take more 
time to learn the facts about 
others. 

What is our image of our¬ 
selves? Many would say that 
we are tolerant, generous, easy¬ 
going, and kind. What is our 
image of the Russian? A recent 
Gallup poll pictures him as 
"rude, clever, ruthless, and 
treacherous.” Ask a Russian 
about his image of himself and 
of an American and the pic- 


August 31, 1959, “I would like 
to believe that people, in the 
long run, are going to do more 
to promote peace than our gov- 


ture is reversed. Notice how 
quickly our concept of a form¬ 
er enemy, the Japanese, has 
(Continued on Page 4) 


Rehfuss Performance 

Reviewer Finds Concert 
4 Musical and Instructive ’ 


By MICHAEL HENDERSON 

Sunday evening we again 
heard Heinz Rehfuss at Middle¬ 
bury. He was here in January 
of 1960, unfortunately on an 
evening when practically n o 
one heard him, since it was the 
last day of the Christmas re¬ 
cess. This time he sang .a pro¬ 
gram of rather limited scope 
but one which seemed to suit 
his voice particularly well. 

He began with the Schumann 
“Dichterliebe,” a song cycle of 
poems oS Heine, giving these 
short but expressive songs the 
full benefit of his dramatic po¬ 
wers of interpretation. The ex¬ 
tended piano part in the “Dich- 


Second' on the program was 
a group of six songs with words 
by Heyse from the “Spanisches 
Liederbuch" of Hugo Wolf. In 
Wolfs songs the texts arc as 
important as the music; Rehfuss 
read an English translation be¬ 
fore each song, making the 
songs more enjoyable, since the 
texts were not printed on the 
program. ■ The singer settled 
down somewhat in these songs, 
and lost some of the uncertain¬ 
ty which had been apparent in 
the Schumann cycle. 

After the intermission Rehfuss 
sang six of Brahms’ German 
folksongs. His sense of humor 
came to the fore here, both as 
he read the translations and as 


terliebe" was beautifully played 
by Natalie Derujinsky, whose 
warm playing added immeasur¬ 
ably to the entire program of 
Romantic and Impressionistic 
music, though at times the 
singer seemed to be requiring 
a support from the piano which 
was not forthcoming. 


he sang the comic songs. This 
was where his voice was shown 
to best advantage, as he used 
the choppiness of the folk mclo* 
dies very effectively to demon¬ 
strate the humour of the songs 
Having taken his audience 
through this short history of the 
(Continued on Page 3) 


r 








THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 1962 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


PAGE 3 



£056 HUNIER- 
CARROll TON 
•fffODwrtON ' 


IN CASIKAN tOLOR! 


Language Group 
Sponsors Study 
Trip To Europe 

Classrooms Aboard, a pro¬ 
gram of study in foreign lan¬ 
guages in native surroundings, 
is sponsoring a nine-week trip 
to Europe for study in the sum¬ 
mer of 1962. Groups will live 
with private families in 11 cities 
in Germany, Austria, France, 
Switzerland, Spain and Italy. 
About 300 students are expected 
to take part in the classes this 
year, and the fee will be $1150 
per student, including transpor¬ 
tation and expenses in Europe. 
Information can be obtained by 
writing to Classrooms Abroad, 
Box 4171 University Station, 
Minneapolis 14, Minn. 

t ratwinm tmtmmrmmmmtmt: 
CHITTENDEN COUNTY 
TRUST CO. 

Addison County Division 

‘The bank of Friendly Service’ 
Member F.D.I.C. 


Art Exhibit 


Rehfuss Recital Reviewed 


(Continued from Page 2) 
German Lied, Rehfuss sang at 
the end of the program Debus¬ 
sy’s “Trois Ballades de Villon." 
These fifteenth century texts 
are set to fairly sustained melo¬ 
dic phrases. Rehfuss had at 
times during the earlier part of 
the program seemed unwillihg 
or unable to produce a sustain¬ 
ed tone, but he rose to the de¬ 
mands of the ‘‘Ballades,’’ and 
though he seemed to be shout¬ 
ing a bit, ‘‘got’’ all the high 
notes with energy and full tone. 

As encore Rehfuss sang one 


of the Brahms songs listed on 
which he had 


color may have been paimea on. 

Actor Prints, Ladies of the 
Green House District and a 
large number of landscape 
scenes by Hiroshige appear in 
the exhibition. There are 16 
Hiroshige prints from the 
complete set of 53 views of the 
Tokaido belonging to the Flem¬ 
ing Museum collection of the 
University of Vermont. Also in¬ 
cluded is a wood block from 
which one of these prints was 
made. 

The only painting in the show 
is a hanging scroll or ‘‘kaki- 
mono” of two shabby male 
figures. One has a brush and 
the other is scrutinizing a 
scroll that seems to be a paint¬ 
ing. This pair belongs to the 
Zen Buddist sect. 

The Oleson Foundation, The 
University of Vermont and Rob¬ 
ert Reiif, assistant professor of 
fine arts, contributed the prints, 
while Mr. and Mrs. Winston 
Dibble of Shoreham supplied 
the painting. 


the program, 
omitted along with one other 
during the main part of the per- 
formance. 

To sum up: what Rehfuss 
seemed to lack in vocal powers 
he more than made up in in¬ 
terpretation and musical taste 
— his voice 


B I G 
SALE 


never got in the 
way of the music, and this is 
something more to be desired 
than the possession of a per¬ 
fect instrument. Altogether it 
was a most musical and instruc¬ 
tive performance. 


NOW 


CAMPUS 


THEATRE 
MIDDLEBURY, VT. 
DU 8-4841 


Fraternities on the Middle- 
bury College campus will be 
able to hear WRMC, the Col¬ 
lege radio station, in the near 
future, according to the sta¬ 
tion's president Peter Leone ’62. 
Telephone lines that will carry 
the broadcasts are in the pro¬ 
cess of installation. 

Sigma Epsilon and Theta Chi 
will not receive broadcasts, but 
Leone commented that ‘‘these 
houses will be included later.’’ 

Other WRMC plans include 
several new programs, one of 
which will be a weekly student 
forum. 


GOING 


THURS.-SAT. JAN. 

Best Directed Picture of 
John Wayne - Stuart Whi 
and Lee Marvin 
“TLzv 


Commancheros 

ALSO 

FOOTBALL HIGHLIGHTS 
1961 

All the Stars & Most Exciting 
Plays of ’61 's Biggest Games 


Good Luck 


SUN.-TUES. JAN. 21-21 

FANNIE HURST'S most compassionate 
romantic dram air' /BH 


Farrell's 


DUPONT GRANT 

Middlebury College was 
among 76 institutions, mostly 
liberal arts colleges, to receive 
grants of $4,000 each from the 
DuPont Co. in its annual pi-o- 
gram to aid education. 

The colleges were chosen on 
their records of strength in 
chemical education’: Each grant 
consists of $2,500 for chemistry 
teaching and $1,500 for other 
courses that contribute to the 
education of scientists and 
engineers. 


THE DOG TEAM 


VtKA mILto ■CHARLES DRAKE-VIRGINIA GREY 
REGINALD GARDINER - A Universal-International Release 


WED.-SAT. JAN. 24-27 

Paul Newman 
in Robert Rossen’s 

“The Hustler” 

With Piper aurie - George C. 
Scott - Jackie Gleason 

N. Y. Film Critics' — 

Best Directed PPicture of 1961 
at 8:30 


30 more days! 


PATRONIZE YOUR 
• ADVERTISERS . 


SIC FLICS 


BEFORE YOU 
GET THE 
SALT BLUES 


Find out about the new 
protective treatment that 
prolongs life of fenders, 
rocker panels, and even 
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onderful, for cars of any 


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PAGE 4 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, I9 (i2 





ty, hunger, and the threat 
war and extinction first? 
Where do you stand? 


arsenal. It would appeal to 
man's natural instinct for love 
and good will, which he desires 
more than fear and physical per¬ 
suasion. It would be a program 
in line with the objectives of 
the Judeo-Christian tradition, 
tile United Nations, the Peace 
Corps, the Alliance for Progress, 
and other proclaimed ambitions 
for a rich and fruitful frontier 
for all men. 

All men, American, Russian, 
Chinese, and African, have the 
same desire for family, home, 
livelihood and survival. What 
men normally place fear, pover¬ 


Unilateral Disarmament 


more opportunity for solution. 
Too often, participants in In¬ 
ternational parleys, believing 
themselves challenged o r 
threatened, are rigid in their 
thinking and discussions fre¬ 
quently terminate with little 
success and much bitter feel¬ 
ing. 

Moral Force 

Rather than making the Uni¬ 
ted States weak and vulnerable, 
gradual unilateral disarmament 
would be a moral force more 
respected than a great nuclear 


to see what Americans are real¬ 
ly like. This would provide an 
opportunity to hear each other's 
viewpoints with patience and in 
a relaxed atmosphere. In such 
a way, both groups would dis¬ 
cover that each held some mis¬ 
conceptions, which when aired 
in a non-combative mood, have 
a better chance of being cor¬ 
rected. This is a technique long 
employed by psychologists. 

With the new facts thus learn¬ 
ed in a congenial atmosphere, 
communication deadlocks have 


(Continued from Page 2) 
changed, or for that matter, our" 
picture of the Red Chinese, the 
German, or the Russian. Cer¬ 
tainly citizen judgment on na¬ 
tional policy in a great demo¬ 
cracy must be premised o p 
sound facts, clear thinking, pa¬ 
tience, and willingness to hear 
the other side. 

Preventive Medicine 
A doctor prefers to study the 
cause of illness (preventive 
medicine) in an effort to pre¬ 
vent an epidemic (curative 
medicine). Those supporting 
unilateral disarmament feel that 
•such a policy is a giant step 
toward removing the fear that 
motivates the Russian to be ag¬ 
gressive and the United States 
to establishing of air bases 
around the U. S. S. R. — and 
thus a move toward peace. 

The vast amount of income 
saved through unilateral dis¬ 
armament could be spent for 
more schools, homes, high¬ 
ways, and durable goods as 
well as for buying more from 
abroad, and for foreign assis¬ 
tance programs. This would 
stimulate business and trade 
and reduce employment. 

Relaxed Atmosphere 
For the price of a single hea-j 
vy bomber, thousands of Rus¬ 
sians and Red Chinese could be 
brought to the United States, to 
live with us, talk with us and 


CORRECTION 

In Professor Illick’s article 
last week there appeared the 
sentence: “Try to imagine a 
100-plane raid on New York City 
oi' Plattsburg, New York, every 
night for 5575 nights (15 years) 
with each plane carrying the 
type of bomb dropped on E u . 
rope during World War II,” j t 
should have read a “1000-plan e 
raid.” 


PICTURE FRAMING 


We have made arrangements with Warren Case to be his agent 
in Middlebury for Picture Framing .... 

Now you can Bring your pictures to 


Grill Sandwiches 

MILK AND ICE CREAM TO TAKE OUT 
CROWLEY CHEDDAR CHEESE 

NEW HOURS: OPEN FROM TEN A.M. TO ONE A.M, 
Closed All Day Monday 
One Mile South of Middlebury on Route 7 


C. G. Cole & Son’s Flower Shop 
10 So. Pleasant St., Middlebury 

Protect your cherished pictures by having them custom framed 
sealed from dirt — ready to hang on the wall. 

Drop in today and look over our moulding samples — 
Prices gladly quoted. 


THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 
SALUTE: DON McCAHAN 


satisfaction, too. Because Don knows that his contributions 
lead to better telephone service for his community. 

Don McCahan of the Bell Telephone Company of Penn¬ 
sylvania, and the other young engineers like him in Bell 
Telephone Companies throughout the country, help make 
your communications service the finest in the world. 


When a new telephone building goes up in his area, Don 
McCahan will be found right in the center of activity. It’s 
Don’s responsibility to work closely with the architects in 
developing blueprints, also to follow up to be sure con¬ 
struction meets specifications. A lot of responsibility for 
a young engineer just two years out of college, but a lot of 


Have your car serviced at 


PROVONCHA’S 
ESSO STATION 

'Moose” Provonclia, Prop, 


BELL TELEPHONE COMPANIES 


TELEPHONE MAN-0F-THE MONTH 


KATHARINE GIBBS 

SECRETARIAL 

BOSTON 16, MASS. . 21 Marlborough Streel 
mew YORK 17, N. Y. . . 230 Park Avenue 

MONTCLAIR, N. J. . . 33 Plymouth Streel 
IMtOVIDENCE 6, R. I. . . 155 Angel! Streel 


VALENTINES 


HALLMARK 


A LARGE 
SELECTION 
FOR YOU TO 
CHOOSE FROM 


PARK DRUG 
STORE 

Tel. DU 8-2522 
Middlebury, Vt. 









THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 1962 


THE CAMPUS, M1DDLEBURY, VERMONT 


PAGE 5 


ized. Someone else commented 
that it sounded like “July 4th 
in January.” Romulo demon¬ 
strated his knowledge of cur¬ 
rent affairs in his quick mind 
when he answered questions, be¬ 
fore and after the address. Com¬ 
bined with his skill in the me¬ 
chanical aspects of speaking, 
these could have produced a 
'speech with a “clearer view of 
the international perspective.” 


those attending the dinner were: 
Lee Lendt, faculty advisor to 
the IRC; John Taylor ’64, pres¬ 
ident; Nancy Porter ’64, secre¬ 
tary-treasurer; Benjamin Rosin 
'62, John Flynn and Charles 
Johnson, both ’63, and Judith 
Denton '64. 


Romulo Honored 
With Reception 
And IRC Dinner 

Prior to his lecture at 8 p.m. 
in Mead Memorial Chapel last 
Thursday, General Carlos Rom¬ 
ulo was the guest of honor at a 
small reception in the Presi¬ 
dent’s dining room at 4 p, m. At 
6:30 p. m. the International iRe- 
lations Club sponsored a dinner 
for the General at the Way- 
bury Inn. 

During the IRC dinner Rom¬ 
ulo answered informal questions 
from those present. Among 


MIDDLEBURY 
SKI SHOP 


SWEATER 


BOVVKER SERVES ON PANEL 

John G. Bowker, dean of the 
faculty, recently served on an 
evaluation panel for the Nation¬ 
al Science Foundation in Wash¬ 
ington, D. C. He was one of the 
40 specialists from U. S. col¬ 
leges and universities to judge 
proposals for NSF In-Service In¬ 
stitutes for 1962-63. 


SALE 


AROUND THE CLOCK 

Redfield Proctor Hall will be 
open around the clock during 
the examination period begin¬ 
ning this Monday. All rooms 
will be available at all times 
except the lounge which will be 
closed at midnight. 


FOR THE FINEST IN FOOD 
THE MAIN DINING ROOM & COFFEE SHOP 


BRUSH MOTORS, INC 


For a Congenial Evening 
the Pine Room 


106 COURT STREET 

FORD — FALCON — MERCURY — COMET 

Complete Service 

Body Shop Wheel Alignment 

Phone DUdley 8-4985 


COMFORTABLE ROOMS 


FOR YOUR FAMILY & FRIENDS 


Beautiful Imported 
Austrian and 
Norweigan 
Sweaters 
at Tremendous 


Savings! 

Priced so low 


Middlebury 
SKI SHOP 


(Across the Green from 
the Post Office) 


"Tareyton's Dual Filter in duas partes divisa est!" 

says Titus (Pretzel Bender) Ursus, darling of the Coliseum 
crowd. Says Pretzel Bender, “After the amphitheater I relax 
and have a Tareyton. Amo, amas... everyone amat Tareyton. 
El tu will, too. Tareyton’s one filter cigarette that really 
delivers tie gustibus.” 


ACTIVATED CHARCOAL 
w INNER FILTER 


A little further 


PURE WHITE 
OU1ER FILTER 


DUAL FILTER 


Product of i/k j/meuean 


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PAGE fi 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 19 G2 


Ice Prospects Up 
As Panthers Split; 
Face Cadets Next 


FROSH 

SPORTS 


Middlebury’s freshman bask¬ 
etball team extended its record 
to an impressive 3-1 in the past 
week’s action, handing once- 
beaten Vermont a one point def¬ 
icit, 49-48, and blasting t h e 
freshmen from Norwich 81-62. 

Against UVM the team start¬ 
ed sluggishly and trailed 31-24 
at the half. The second period 
the squad fought back to within 
one point of the leaders with 10 
seconds remaining. Then Pete 
Karlson sunk a jumper from 
the keyr Pete led the Midd 
scorers with 17 in a decisive 
team victory. 

Norwich Downed 

The cadets from Norwich fell 
victim to a second half barrage 
of baskets as coach Morrone 
swept the benches of all re¬ 
serves last Monday. Karlson 
again led. this time with a 
season's high of 27, while Bob 
Royer and Gerry Moppert each 
scored 13. 

Following last night’s home 
match with a tough Vermont 
Academy five the frosh plan a 
brief respite till after final ex¬ 
ams. 

Hockey Unbeaten 

The freshmen hockey squad 
found similar success in win¬ 
ning its second game by a 3-2 
margin over a strong Kimball 
Union Academy. Dave Jensen 
broke a 2-2 deadlock for the 
Pnnthers with four minutes re- j 
maining. 

Jim Hunt and Fred Stetson 
accounted for the other Middle- 1 
bury goals as Larry Leahy's 
brilliant defensive pluy and Teci\ 
Morse’s 32 saves limited the op-1 
ponent to two scores. After the 
scheduled game with the Nor¬ 
wich Cadets Saturday at four 
the icemen take a breather for 
finals at the mid-point of the 
season. 


midable rivals Yale and Hamilton. The encouragin' 
aspect about the two efforts was the fact that for the 
first time we put together successive periods of fj ne 
team play and good spirited efforts. With half the 
Manitemach schedule still remaining prospects are still probable 
for a better than even record this season. 

After the long trip to New Ha¬ 
ven on Jan. 10 the Panthers pro¬ 
ceeded to play their best game 
of the year before bowing out 
to the slick skating Elis 3-1. The 
first period was perhaps the 
prettiest exhibition of hockey in 
quite some time as play was 
both fast and to the letter of the 
rules. No goals were scored in 
this torid period and only one 
infraction was called on either 
team. We pressed Yale unmerci¬ 
fully during the opening stanza 
getting 20 shots at their goal. 

The passing was exceptional and 
Captain Chuck Gately played a 
beautiful period to make the 
fast-improving defense look 
even better. 

Dates Adds Another 
The second period was not 
quite as rewarding for Middle- 
bury as the first, but the Pan¬ 
thers stayed right with the Elis 
during the second devastating 
period considering the heat. 

Yale opened the scoring early 
in the period making use of 
their deceptive "trailer” play. 

Dates Fryberger scored his 24th 
goal of the year midway in the 
period to even matters for the 
only time of the evening. Before 
leaving the rink Yale added an¬ 
other score on a screened shot 
from close up. 

The last period pointed out our 
lack of depth, but the boys still 
hustled ot the end. The notice¬ 
able drop in the number of shots 
taken at the Yale goalie in the 
last two periods was the only 
detracting sidelight from an oth¬ 
erwise fine all-around perform¬ 
ance, Yale scored midway in the 
last period to put the pressure 
on Dates, but despite a tremen¬ 
dous effort be was not quite able 
to even the count in the fashion ' 


Basketball Continues Fall 
With Pair Of Late Losses 


By ANDY TROOB 

Following a distressingly sim¬ 
ilar pattern, the Middlebury 
basketball team lost another 
pair of games during the past 
week despite several periods of 
sustained fine play. As in many 
past contests this year the Pan¬ 
thers put up a real fight for 
the first 20 minutes, only to 
succumb in the second half due 
to lack of both height and depth. 

On January 10 Vermont visit¬ 
ed Middlebury for the first of 
the annual State Championship 
games. Many expected the Cat¬ 
amounts to make a quick run¬ 
away of the contest, but for the 
first half it was an even 
ballgame. Captain Bill Jackson 
did a great all-around job on 
the highly touted Bennie Becton 
ot UVM. The rest of the team 
combined a fine floor game 
with a good shooting percentage 
to leave the court behind by a 
slim 41-38 margin at the half¬ 
time. 

At the start of -the second 
half the backcourt combination 
of Jim Shabel and Richie Ader 
drastically changed the com¬ 
plexion of the ballgame. The 


from John Weekes. From here 
on out the boys seemed to lose 
their fine sense of timing, but 
the lead was large enough and 
the opposition weak enough to 
insure an easy victory. Hamil¬ 
ton's goal came late in the first 
period on a deflection, but 
Dates was once again equal to 
the task on a return pass from 
defenseman Weekes. 

The second period featured a 
beautiful cross-shot goal by so¬ 
phomore Roger Lewandowski 
on another assist from White. 
Then played subsided and some 
sloppiness set in as the game 
continued scoreless for the last 
30 minutes. Germond played an 
outstanding defensive game to 
the delight of the crowd on 
hand. Bill Brian relieved Gately 
in the nets and also played well 
during the last period. All in all 
it was a fine team effort with 
many flashes of brilliance of 
past glory. The weaker teams 
are coming up with a few tough 
opponents intermingled giving 
our fast-improving team time 
enough to get set for the big 
games in hopes of salvaging a 
winning season. 


Hep So began its winning 
| streak with a 43-31 victory over 
Zetc. Ido, with 18, and Gil¬ 
christ, with 14, were the trf^ 
scorers for the freshmen, Deke 
beat CP 34-29, with the loser's 
Johnson netting 18. Pozefsky’s 11 
was high for the winners. 

DU ran wild over Hep So 
and won 64-26. Rapp's 14 was 
| high as everyone got into the 
I scoring act. Hep So came into 
it’s own with a 42-31 victory 
over a once highly regarded 
DKE squad. Gilchrist was high 
for the winners with 16. 

Si'g Ep beat Hep No 51-29 with 
Owren’s 13 leading the winner’s 
balanced scoring attack. Hen¬ 
ry of the losers was high in 
the game with 15. ATO handed 
CP its second loss 45-34. Baker 
of ATO and Johnson of CP Jed 
all scorers with 15 apiece. 

The Faculty, led by Mor- 
rone’s 18, had an easy time 
downing KDR 31-15. Slug flex¬ 
ed its muscles and doubled TC’s 
score, 36-18, Conner was high 
for the winners with 18. 

In the season’s only overtime 
game to date Hep So edged KDR 
43-42. Sylvester of KDR was 
high scorer with 22 points. Ide 
was tops for the winners with 


As the basketball season en¬ 
ters the last week before the 
semester break the class of both 
leagues has begun to show. In 
the Blue League Sig Ep and DU 
lend the pack with 3-0 records. 
Slug and PKT follow close be¬ 
hind with 3-1 and 2-1 records 
respectively. The top teams in 
the- White League are ATO and 
Hep So. both with 3-0 records. 
Deke is the other contender in 
this league with a .3-1 record to 
bate. 

The Starr club of the Blue 
League has decided to drop out 
of their league. This leaves the 
boys from this club free to play 
for one or both of the Hepburn 
teams. 

Johnson of Chi Psi has taken 
an early lead in the individual 
scoring race. His 48 points are 
good for a 16 point per game 
aveage, Milenski of PKT is sec¬ 
ond with a 15.5 average, follow¬ 
ed by the 14 point average of 
Hep North's Henry. These boys 
will be pushed by Johnson of 
DU, Lloyd of ATO. Owren of 
SE, and others as the season 
gets older. 

PKT started the season with j 
an easy 39-17 victory over ASP. 
Milinski outscored the losers in 
this one getting 18 for himself. | 
ATO opened with a 47-25 romp i 
KDR. Lloyd led the winners with | 
18 points that day. 


Man scorn Leads X-Country 


The highlights of the Hanover | 
Invitational Cross Country and 
Jump held January 13 and 14 at 
Dartmouth were, without ques¬ 
tion contained in the cross-coun¬ 
try race. Unlike a regular re¬ 
lay race in skiing, this race 
was a mass start. This puts the 
emphasis and the excitement 
mainly at the beginning of the 
race. This Invitational meet 
had 25 teams entered with some 
of the top runners in the coun¬ 
try on both national and col¬ 
legiate teams. 

Stiff Battle 

A close race was run between 
the Middlebury and Dartmouth 
teams. Ed Hixon came in .93 
second behind the Dartmouth 
first man. Spencer Jackson 
made up this difference by 
coming in two minutes ahead 
of the Dartmouth second man 
at the mid-point of the race. 
Although Hank Tauber ran a 
fine race he lost the lead, leav¬ 
ing it squarely to Dave Hans- 
com to retain the Panther su¬ 
premacy in Eastern Nordic 
competition that has been built 


>•* 


CAMPUS — Manley 

CAPTAIN SPIiNUER JACKSON glides to successful 
jump in competition at Hanover last weekend in warmup for 
stiff Carnival schedule ahead. 


Chi Psi picked up a win from 
Zete by a 28-18 score. Johnson 
■again led CP with 15. DU romp¬ 
ed over PKT 52-27 


up in the past few years. a 1:03 minute margin. Dave 
Dave finished in a glorious individual time put him ahea 
rush and pulled the race out by ot many on national teams, 







THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, 1962 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


Department 
Qf State Has 
Internships 

The Department of State has 
instituted a summer intern pro¬ 
-am for college students in¬ 
terested in foreign affairs. 
Twenty-five students will b e 
selected for assignments in 
Washington, D. C. 

Background and interest in the 
field are the basis for appoint¬ 
ment. The salary is $77 a week 
for the period from June 15 to 
August 30, with a possible ex¬ 
tension to September 15. 

Each candidate must be a 
United States citizen, must have 
completed at least his junior 
year and be planning to return 
to school in the fall. 

In addition, he must have a 
cumulative grade average of at 
least a “B”, have had two years 
of college training in a modern 
language or have attained equi¬ 
valent proficiency, and be able 
to write effectively. 

Each applicant must also be 
seriously interested in a career 
in foreign affairs. 

Middlebury College can nomi¬ 
nate one student. Interested 
juniors and seniors should con¬ 
tact Gordon Perine, at the 
Placement Office. 


MOVIE AT PROCTOR 

"Bell, Book, and Candle” will 
be shown tomorrow evening at 
C:30 and 8:30 in ‘ Proctor 
Lounge. The movie stars Ernie 
Kovacs, Jack Lemmon, James 
Stewart and Kim Novak. Ad¬ 
mission will be by I.D. card 
with a charge of 25 cents 

The Recreation Committee of 
the Board of Governors will 
also sponsor Tension-Breaker 
movies during the exam per¬ 
iod. The 45-minute^program of 
cartoons will be presented in 
Proctor Lounge at 8 p. m., Jan. 
23 and 25. "Mr. Magoo,” "Lau¬ 
rel and Hardy” and "Looney 
Toons" are among the cartoons 
to be shown. Admission is free. 


To The Editor... 

(Continued from Page 2) 
a collection which includes such 
vile works is outrageous and 
merits close investigation by 
the administration, faculty, and 
Board of Trustees. Such books 
can only lead to a weakening 
of Wie moral fiber of those who 
read them. 

I hope that in my next visit 
to my alma mater such books 
as Mr. Miller’s will not be in 
the collection. 

Reverend Jacob Pitt ’18 


Fed Up 


To the Editor: 

On the average of once or 
twice every year, one of our 
campus kitchens manages to in¬ 
capacitate the population of one 


or more of our college dormi¬ 
tories. This seems to us to be a 
rather large ratio of error, but 
we must be mistaken: if it 
were, Our Administration would 
have done something about it 
long ago. However, as senior 
women, we are deeply concern¬ 
ed with the preservation of 
those special Traditions that set 
Middlebury apart from the or¬ 
dinary run of colleges. There¬ 
fore, we would like to propose 
that the symptoms and treat¬ 
ment for ptomaine and other 
food poisonings be included in 
the Handbook. 

June Andrews, Isabel Bak- 
ke, Linda Beauregard, Bren¬ 
da Behan, Anne Bossi, Jud¬ 
ith Bosworth, Carol Brew¬ 
er, Martha Buckwalter, Al¬ 
ice Carleton, Jean Chis¬ 
holm, Frances Connolly, Al¬ 
ice Couperus, Doris Crim- 


mins, Marjorie Gassncr, 
Beverly Ilensel, Sarah 
Howland, Katherine Leary, 
and Jane MacFarlane. 

Also, Marion Meade, Su- 


PAGE 7 

ellyn Fond, Barbara Smith, 
Susan Stevens, Susan Tcn- 
Brocck, Jane Vollaiul, Kate 
Warren, Margaret Woodfill 
■ and Nora Wright. 


EXAMS 

WE CAN’T TAKE THEM FOR YOU 
BUT WE CAN MAKE TRAVEL 
ARRANGEMENTS FOR YOU AFTER EXAMS 
TO ANY DESTINATION YOU NAME. 
FROM KATMANDU TO TIMBUKTU. 

Don’t forget on Feb. 5 we move to our new 
location at 73 Main Street. 


During Exams 
instead of chewing 
your fingernails 
Have an assortment 
of our delicious fresh 
roasted Double Kay nuts 


FISHER 


SERVICE 


2 Park Street Middlebury, Vt. 

In Skihaus 

Phone DU 8-2362 Office Hours 9-12 1-5 

Saturdays By Appointment Only 


K\ 


7 * 


cR/p 




Vermont Drug, Inc. 

TWO REGISTERED PHARMACISTS 
Main St. DU 8-4977 Middlebury 


je Waqjfcurji ^Irm 


ALL MEALS BY 
RESERVATION 


CLOSED TUESDAYS 

DUdley 8-4372 


MEN S 

SPORTSWEAR 

SALE 

SPORT COATS 
LODEN COATS 


<%> 




OFF 


jiktlfaus 


SKI and SPORT SHOPS 


MORE SUN 


COURSE 




I % 

f ^ 

MORE SNOW 


SKI CAPITAL 
OF THE EAST 

For folders, Information or 
reservations, write lodge of 
your choice or Box 206 CT. 
Stowe Area Association, 
•nc,, Stowe, Vermont. 


: . es 

Largest Selection 


THE VERMONT BOOK SHOP 


S SHETLANDS 
A SHIRTS 


SLACKS 


OTIS 

BARBER SHOP 


Two Barbers 
No Walt 















| Junior Year 

I m 

I New York 


An unusual one-year 
€0liege program 


MaM 

BSuifitWa 

Write for 
hraehure tot 


junior Year Program 
How Yerfc Unlvmliy 
I New York 3 # N> Y« 


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tunvor 


New 


"Put me down, 
George ... / 
SA/0 p(/r 
DOWN!" 


IF TOBACCO COULD TALK (and who is certain it can’t?) it would beg to be placed 
in Luckies. However, we would turn a deaf ear. Only tobacco that can prove its 
worth will ever get in a Lucky. This may seem heartless—but it pays! Today, 
college students smoke more Luckies than any other regular. We’d never be 
able to make that statement if we listened to every slick-talking tobacco leaf that 
tried to get into Luckies. 


CHANGE TO LUCKIES and get some taste for a change! 

©4. r. Co. Product of i/Ja J‘/nvt/ucn7i <Jc&<jC£ 0 ~Ccrryianrf-- iJudxuxo is our middle natiii 


THE CAMPUS, MIDDLERURY, VERMONT 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 18, i %2 


Rowan To Join Health Service 
For Disease Research Project 


Middlebury’s biology depart¬ 
ment will lose an assistant pro¬ 
fessor this June when William 
B. Rowan leaves to join the 
Puerto Rico Field Station of the 
Communicable Disease Center 
of the United States Public 
Health Service. It is one of a 
number of stations engaged in 
disease research and control in 
co-operation with the World 
Health Organization and the 
Pan American Health Organi¬ 
zation. 


Rowan’s specific project will 
be to work on preventive and 
control measures against bil- 
harziasis, a parasitic disease 
which afflicts 150 million people 
in Africa, Latin America, the 
Middle East, and parts of Asia. 

“Due to a quirk of nature,” 
Rowan explained, “tropical 
areas were endowed with more 
than their share of the parasitic 
diseases that afflict mankind 
and his domestic animals. Even 
in the last two centuries while 


we in the western world were 
engaged in the industrial revo¬ 
lution, tropical peoples have 
had to contend with an over¬ 
whelming burden of disease. 
For example, while polio, in its 
worst year in the United Stales, 
struck 50,000 people, or 0.03 per 
cent of the United States popu¬ 
lation, malaria annually strikes 
more than 15 percent of the 
tropical population. 

“Most parasitic diseases of 
man are not killers. They at¬ 
tack most frequently during the 
active, breadwinning years of 
life, making difficult if not im¬ 
possible the sustained economic 


emerging 

W0 >’!d to. 


growth which some 
nations face. In the 
day, where the security 0 f a] | 
nations has come to depel 
more and more on the securlt 
and well being of individual pj 
pie everywhere, it is a decided 
challenge of more effi cient 
means of controlling those cr¬ 
eases that keep young econo.' 
mies from growing.’’ 

Rowan hopes t 0 remain with 

the Puerto Rico Field Stv, 
nation 

for four years or more and then 
spend several additional years 
on similar projects with t hc 
Public Health Service in newly 
independent nations. 


Carter Presents 
Music Programs 
Over WCAX-TV 

Enrichment programs in mu¬ 
sic, taught by Alan Carter, pro¬ 
fessor of music, are again be¬ 
ing presented to 20,000 Vermont 
grade-school students through 
the facilities of WCAX-TV. 

Begun in 1056 in cooperation 
with the State Department of 
Education and the Vermont 
State Symphony Orchestra As¬ 
sociation, the program proved 
so successful the first year that 
the State Department of Educa¬ 
tion sponsored four additional 
subjects the following year. 

This year the department is 
sponsoring all five programs — 
music, science, mathematics, 
art and social studies. The Ver¬ 
mont State Symphony Orches¬ 
tra Association still co-sponsors 
the music program and pays 
extra performers’ fees. 

The music course covers basic 
theory, history, and literature 
of various periods. All five pro¬ 
grams are used as integral parts 
of the school curriculum and 
are of particular help in small 
schools where there are no mu¬ 
sic or art courses. 

In addition to Carter, teach¬ 
ers from the State Teachers’ 
College, the University of Ver¬ 
mont, and the public school sys¬ 
tem of Burlington participate. 


PECK’S 
GUEST HOUSE 

Middlebury, Vt. 
Specialty Vermont Hospitality 
73 N. Pleasant St. DU 8-2955 


NORTON’S 
BEAUTY SHOP 

Haircutting & Styling 
76 Court St. 
Near the Stoplight 
Tel. DU 8-4483 


PAGE 8 


DR. ALAN CARTER 


MEET YOUR FRIENDS 

AT 

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OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

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presents: 


UFFERS 


'A T THE PROM" 


Hanes Annual 


ends Saturday, Jan. 20 

Hurry down, take advantage of 
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The Grey Shop